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                                                          WATERPROOFING VERSUS DAMPPROOFING


There is a distinct difference between dampproofing and waterproofing. Dampproofing is intended to keep out soil moisture while waterproofing keeps out both moisture and liquid water. Buildings have been dampproofed for years, a practice that used to be mistakenly referred to as waterproofing. (CODE) specifies the conditions that require either dampproofing or waterproofing. Any concrete or masonry foundation walls "that retain earth and enclose interior spaces and floors below grade shall be dampproofed from the top of the footing to the finished grade. Waterproofing is only required only in areas where a high water table or other severe soil-water conditions are known to exist."


Dampproofing is a coating, usually asphalt-based, that is either sprayed on or hand applied to the outside of the wall. Though less frequently recommended in modern residential construction, it is still an acceptable form of treatment in many situations. The drawbacks include an inability to seal larger cracks or holes left by form ties and the potential for damage by coarse or careless backfill. But with proper surface drainage, correctly installed foundation drains at the footing, and the absence of hydrostatic pressure to drive water infiltration, dampproofing can supply adequate and long-lasting protection for many crawl spaces and basements.There is a distinct difference between dampproofing and waterproofing. Dampproofing is intended to keep out soil moisture while waterproofing keeps out both moisture and liquid water. Buildings have been dampproofed for years, a practice that used to be mistakenly referred to as waterproofing. Some codes specifies the conditions that require either dampproofing or waterproofing. Any concrete or masonry foundation walls "that retain earth and enclose interior spaces and floors below grade shall be dampproofed from the top of the footing to the finished grade.
Waterproofing is only required in areas where a high water table or other severe soil-water conditions are known to exist."



Waterproofing a foundation requires the same care as dampproofing in regard to surface treatment and drain pipe, but is much more exacting in the treatment of the wall itself. Obviously, if there is any doubt about whether or not dampproofing will do the job, it's best to spend the extra time and money to waterproof, particularly for habitable space.

Local conditions vary widely and help determine the right choice for preventing water infiltration. Some areas with drier climates and lower water tables regularly build basements with foundation walls that may be 10 feet tall. Other areas, with high annual rainfall, high water tables, and no frost in the soil, more commonly use slab-on-grade foundations. But even these foundations need protection to keep moisture from migrating up from the ground through the slab And consider topography—a walkout basement built into the side of a hill has a good opportunity to use gravity to move sub-surface water away, whereas a full basement on the flats in a wet area may have to consider mechanical means in the absence of nearby well-drained soil.

Of course the depth of the foundation wall and the use of the interior space will also determine the choice of methods. A 36-inch frost wall for an unheated crawlspace built on well-drained soil and employing a gravity drain is a good candidate for damp-proofing. The house next door with a 10-foot-high foundation wall and a finished basement might opt for a fully waterproofed foundation wall system.

The first line of defense is the concrete itself. Walls should be reinforced to keep cracks tight and the concrete should be well consolidated.


Most waterproofing is an exterior coating, on the positive side (exterior) of the wall, although another option is to use an admixture that makes the concrete itself impervious to water and water vapor. 
All waterproofing and dampproofing starts with a clean, smooth wall surface. Loose particles should be washed or brushed off,  And removed, and any existing cracks repaired. New concrete should be allowed to cure and dry out for 7 to 14 days, although some spray-on membranes can be applied to green concrete.You should always use an Elastomeric waterproof membrane, on the foundation walls. Elastomeric coatings have crack bridging ability, which means. The coating expands and contratcs, with 

the movement of any crack.

Dampproofing is a relatively simple treatment of a seamless rubberized asphaltic membrane material that is sprayed on or applied with brush or roller.  Although many will hire a specialty waterproofing contractor to handle foundation waterproofing projects. Sometimes you may need to rent a back hoe for digging. Which requires to dig down to the footing. which could reach 5 to 8 feet deep. And some jobs you can dig out with a shovel. But you have to dig down 6 feet deep. which equals one ton of dirt. Call Sahara Waterproofing today for all of your waterproofing needs. 1-855-726-6928


True waterproofing requires more time and effort. The outside of the wall is covered with an impermeable coating that extends down to the drain. One method employs sheets fastened to the wall and lapped adequately at seams, both vertical and horizontal. Another method uses several layers of sprayed-on seamless material built up to the thickness specified by the manufacturer.
Some of the spray-on treatments require a priming coat and then one or more final layers of a liquid-rubber, elastomeric coating built up to usually a minimum 60-mil thickness. These coatings dry in about 60 minutes to form a seamless barrier which is resistant to puncture.
Another way to waterproof is to apply sheet products, typically rubberized asphaltic membranes attached to polyethylene film. These sheets are fastened directly to the wall, either using a peel-and-stick approach or with separate mastic, sometimes augmented with fasteners. Adequate lapping at seams, 2 to 3 inches, is important and be careful to prevent gaps or "fish mouths" at the edges. The sheets can be cut with a razor and pressed down to seal. For bubbled areas, slit the membrane, press it down, and apply a patch of membrane right over the top.
The International Residential Code specifies that the membrane must extend from the top of the footing to the finished grade, but a better approach is to take the membrane over the footing and down into the drain trench.
For very wet foundations, a waterproofing contractor might use bentonite waterproofing panels. These panels are made of bentonite clay sandwiched between cardboard. This clay is highly expansive and when water makes contact it forms an impenetrable barrier against infiltration.Type your paragraph here.